Saturday again.

in-the-morning-after-2-mls-of-rain
5 mls of very welcome rain had the frogs calling.
nest
Another busy week with the spreading of mulch and preparing the garden for the possibility of hotter than usual days. Visited Lismore and viewed the orchid display in a shopping centre. I had no idea such a variety in colour and shape in the blooms.
lismore-orchid-display

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Bio-diversity with-out herbicides.

[The Quarterly Review of Biology March 2013] — “Several years ago, I attended a seminar on the psychology of the animal-liberation movement. The speaker observed that although very few animal-lib activists were actually religious, most such people scored very highly on the “religiosity” scale in personality inventories. He suggested that animal liberation served the same functions for such people as religion did for many more: it gave life meaning and conferred a group identity centered on shared moral superiority over others. After years of interacting with “weed warriors”—people who spend their free time trying to eradicate “invasive species” from parks and public lands—I would advance the same hypothesis about most of them. They tend to be absolutely convinced of the righteousness of their cause and highly resistant to any suggestion that naturalized exotics might not be all bad. They also tend to be oblivious to the disconcerting degree to which their rhetoric converges to that of racists and xenophobes, and highly defensive if you point that out to them. After all, they are on the “green” side, right?

Time we learnt to adapt to climate change.

http://weedsnetwork.com/traction?type=digest_html&proj=WeedsNews&sdate=20140913&edate=20140925

Survey.

Council is currently reviewing the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and wants to hear from the community about their views and aspirations for managing Byron Shire’s biodiversity values. The first stage of the community consultation is a survey.

The survey will only take 5 – 10 minutes to complete and the responses will be considered as part of the Strategy review.

The survey can be completed online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SZGR7DK

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Survey.

Council is currently reviewing the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and wants to hear from the community about their views and aspirations for managing Byron Shire’s biodiversity values. The first stage of the community consultation is a survey.

The survey will only take 5 – 10 minutes to complete and the responses will be considered as part of the Strategy review.

The survey can be completed online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SZGR7DK

NewScientist 02 April 2014] — WE HAVE all heard a lot of bad stuff about introduced species: they run rampant through our ecosystems, costing billions to control each year. They are also accused of driving native species extinct. Indeed, alien species are often cited as one of the big threats to biodiversity. Not so fast. In Where Do Camels Belong? The story and science of invasive species, plant biologist Ken Thompson argues that most alien species – even some topping the eco-horror lists – cause little or no lasting damage and aren’t worth the angst, effort or money we devote to controlling them. Purple loosestrife, for example, is often viewed as one of the worst invasive weeds in North America because it forms dense stands of tall, conspicuous flowering heads. But when ecologists looked closer, reports Thompson, there was little evidence of actual harm. Even in Hawaii – poster child for the noxious effects of alien species – invaders tend to make ecosystems more diverse, not less. Nor are introduced species the financial burden they are often made out to be. For one thing, says Thompson, hardly anyone bothers to count the economic benefits of “aliens” such as wheat and cows – a sum that runs to $800 billion per year in the US alone. Moreover, much of the cost of the invaders turns out to be the money spent controlling them.
sprayed

Above photo is of road side spraying taken 6 months ago. Below is how the so called weed has responded.
6-months-after-herbicide-spraying.-Growing-resistance.

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Saturday

Weather jumping from humid to cool as the cold air from the south comes north. A 3 minute heavy dump of rain during the night was welcome although an hour would have been welcomed.

king-parrot

I have been waiting for the autopsy results from the body of the red-leg pademelon that died here on September 4. Finally I received a call that told me the lab couldn’t perform it due to the body being in a state of decay. A fact I and others involved find hard to believe. The body was transported with-in 24 hours after its death. I have later been told domestic animals receive priority at this facility, ironic after a week that the media is repeating that feral cats number over 15 million in the country-side and are destroying our remaining wild-life. All reports said how it is vital to take country wide action.
It now appears, a horrific skin condition that no-one I have talked to had seen before, is not a priority to find out exactly what has caused it.
red-leg-pademelon-1

I read and hear how the Local Greens are imploding with Rose Wanchap’s defection to the developer right wing of the elected Councillors. Shame really but from where I see it the local Greens had lost sight of the whole environment and its guardians some time ago. Hinterland issues, ie herbicide use increase, feral dogs and cats, encouraging better use of land instead of mowing, support for organic food production ect, plastic bags which we were told 10 years ago would be phased out and on it goes. The local Green vote is little more than a feel good vote and that is where it now appears to start and end. To reignite the passion and good-will of active environmentalists, the local Greens need to re-establish dialogue and get out of their cosy cubby holes and find out what is actually happening in the whole shire.

Open public meetings perhaps ? The current derision we are witnessing between Wanchap supporters and those opposed to her, is paralleled in the dismal state of Australian politics generally. It really is time to grow up.

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Herbicide free innovators respond to Council.

Council is currently reviewing the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and wants to hear from the community about their views and aspirations for managing Byron Shire’s biodiversity values. The first stage of the community consultation is a survey.

The survey will only take 5 – 10 minutes to complete and the responses will be considered as part of the Strategy review.

The survey can be completed online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SZGR7DK

garden-edge
a-bit-blurry

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Love in.

three-sets-of-eyes

This morning one of the three had found a meal. A bush turkey I suspect. All my hens are here.
full-belly

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Sunday.

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/green-living/campaign-to-put-ecocide-on-a-par-with-genocide-in-attempt-to-curb-environmental-destruction-9789297.html

another-one

From Geoff Dawe.

There is information (see below) that nitrogen fixing trees such as the Coral tree naturally appear in great numbers in wet areas, particularly wetlands, so their appearance alongside creeks is a natural occurrence. People wishing to poison them need to be asked why they are resisting the regeneration obviously being carried out by the coral trees in that the trees volunteer to add more nitrogen to the soil than if the coral trees were not there? They also need to be asked whether they are aware that parrots in particular feed from its flowers? Coral trees, like camphors and wattles are pioneers. They improve soil and shade levels for climax communities. These pioneers can all be expected to go into recession when they are shaded out by the climax communities.
Our chemical-free method of bush regeneration is to leave the coral trees alone and see them as a benefit. Native trees are planted among them to take advantage of their nitrogen. Branches can be lopped strategically from the coral trees to allow in light if that is preferred. Lopped branches are stacked in pyramid fashion so they are not in contact with soil to prevent the branches re-sprouting.

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