Oskar.

Oskar
Photo taken by Rodney Weidland.

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Koala in residence.

above-the-hen-house

A koala slumbered in a blue fig tree next to the hen house. Temps touched 36 degrees on Monday. It looked healthy and well nourished. Yesterday, it moved to higher ground behind the garden.

The resident snakes too have moved, one into the garden and another into the trees next to the cabin. Now the hens will have to be restricted. The third snake swallowed a cotton sheet that lay in the bottom of the hen’s laying nest. I had never witnessed a snake swallowing material before but as a couple of locals have seen the same thing I am no longer surprised. The snake remains digesting in the wood stove. Its colour has dulled and it is lethargic to what it was preceding its mistaken meal. I hope it recovers.

http://koalacount.ala.org.au/bdrs-core/npansw/home.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-02-14/results-of-koala-chlamydia-vaccine-trial-look-promising/5260186

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What Byron Shire needs to host.

The Weed’s Network (TWN) is hosting a day-long workshop on chemical free weed management. Learn about proven approaches to weed management without chemical input. Gain insight into current public perceptions of the herbicide pollution issue. Also, participate in a roundtable discussion to share your opinions and ideas with other participants. Meals are provided. This includes a lunch which will be prepared from weeds harvested from the CERES garden. The event will be followed by the official launch of the Herbicide Reduction Strategy for Australia, and TWN’s Working with Weeds Guide.

http://www.eventbee.com/v/chemfree2014

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white-cuckoo-shrike

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Saturday again.

in-the-morning-after-2-mls-of-rain
5 mls of very welcome rain had the frogs calling.
nest
Another busy week with the spreading of mulch and preparing the garden for the possibility of hotter than usual days. Visited Lismore and viewed the orchid display in a shopping centre. I had no idea such a variety in colour and shape in the blooms.
lismore-orchid-display

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Bio-diversity with-out herbicides.

[The Quarterly Review of Biology March 2013] — “Several years ago, I attended a seminar on the psychology of the animal-liberation movement. The speaker observed that although very few animal-lib activists were actually religious, most such people scored very highly on the “religiosity” scale in personality inventories. He suggested that animal liberation served the same functions for such people as religion did for many more: it gave life meaning and conferred a group identity centered on shared moral superiority over others. After years of interacting with “weed warriors”—people who spend their free time trying to eradicate “invasive species” from parks and public lands—I would advance the same hypothesis about most of them. They tend to be absolutely convinced of the righteousness of their cause and highly resistant to any suggestion that naturalized exotics might not be all bad. They also tend to be oblivious to the disconcerting degree to which their rhetoric converges to that of racists and xenophobes, and highly defensive if you point that out to them. After all, they are on the “green” side, right?

Time we learnt to adapt to climate change.

http://weedsnetwork.com/traction?type=digest_html&proj=WeedsNews&sdate=20140913&edate=20140925

Survey.

Council is currently reviewing the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and wants to hear from the community about their views and aspirations for managing Byron Shire’s biodiversity values. The first stage of the community consultation is a survey.

The survey will only take 5 – 10 minutes to complete and the responses will be considered as part of the Strategy review.

The survey can be completed online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SZGR7DK

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Survey.

Council is currently reviewing the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and wants to hear from the community about their views and aspirations for managing Byron Shire’s biodiversity values. The first stage of the community consultation is a survey.

The survey will only take 5 – 10 minutes to complete and the responses will be considered as part of the Strategy review.

The survey can be completed online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SZGR7DK

NewScientist 02 April 2014] — WE HAVE all heard a lot of bad stuff about introduced species: they run rampant through our ecosystems, costing billions to control each year. They are also accused of driving native species extinct. Indeed, alien species are often cited as one of the big threats to biodiversity. Not so fast. In Where Do Camels Belong? The story and science of invasive species, plant biologist Ken Thompson argues that most alien species – even some topping the eco-horror lists – cause little or no lasting damage and aren’t worth the angst, effort or money we devote to controlling them. Purple loosestrife, for example, is often viewed as one of the worst invasive weeds in North America because it forms dense stands of tall, conspicuous flowering heads. But when ecologists looked closer, reports Thompson, there was little evidence of actual harm. Even in Hawaii – poster child for the noxious effects of alien species – invaders tend to make ecosystems more diverse, not less. Nor are introduced species the financial burden they are often made out to be. For one thing, says Thompson, hardly anyone bothers to count the economic benefits of “aliens” such as wheat and cows – a sum that runs to $800 billion per year in the US alone. Moreover, much of the cost of the invaders turns out to be the money spent controlling them.
sprayed

Above photo is of road side spraying taken 6 months ago. Below is how the so called weed has responded.
6-months-after-herbicide-spraying.-Growing-resistance.

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